artandsciencejournal:

Cartographic Assemblages

Maps help us find our way in the world (or make us even more lost), but the concept of a map can also be applied when trying to organize together memories, identity, narrative and materiality.

Artist Lindsey Dunnagan explores the mapping of memories and identity in her series Mapping the Intangible, while in Mapping New Worlds, the artist focuses on manipulating topography, hinting at familiar places, but distorted in a way that the familiar becomes alien.

The materiality of Dunnagan’s work in Mapping the Intangible is significant because the watercolour is mixed with salt, allowing unexpected patterns to form, as if creating city limits, but also transform over time as the salt dries and flakes off. The artist focuses on locations that are familiar and important to her memories and identity, yet unrecognizable to the viewer because the maps juxtapose on one another, creating “false connections”, rather serving, as the artist states, “as an atlas of memory that informs identity”. The same kind of atlas, albeit abstract, can be found in Mapping New Worlds but rather than focusing just on identity and memory, the pieces in this series focus on “concepts of city development, communication, and abstracted” landscape. Familiar images such as cities and roads are obstructed by rivers or clouds, creating an almost mythological narrative of the geography.

Similar to Dunnagan’s work, is that of Scott W. Bradford’s, but rather than mapping out specific locations which focus on geography, Bradford pieces together various elements which map out a narrative through materiality. The artist states that he links “the materiality of the surface to the drawing itself, either metaphorically or in terms of the narrative” in order to emphasize that it is constructed; his maps are fiction. In both his series’ Blueshift and Journey to Nowhere, stories are being told.

Each piece maps out its own narrative, but when the series is presented as a whole, the works become a collection of stories, mapping out an overall narrative of materiality.

-Anna Paluch

likeafieldmouse:

Musée du Quai Branly - Tatoueurs, Tatoues

"The art of tatoueurs runs far and deep throughout the historical archives, popping up in feudal Japan, centuries of Russian prison culture, early Roman civilizations and Native American tribes. Over the years, the tattoo has served as a mark of dishonor in one hemisphere and a sign of social prestige in another, a badge of courage in both the military and criminal realms.

Tattoos of yesteryear are essentially anthropological road signs, providing glimpses into the behaviors and rituals of peoples past. Even Otzi, that Iceman from 3,000 BC, lay claim to 50 prehistoric tattoos. And the word itself — tattoo — owes its origins to the Polynesian tatau observed by Captain Cook’s crew in the 18th century. Covet an indelible design today, and you’re harkening back to a practice performed by our earliest ancestors.

A new exhibit at the Musée du Quai Branly is paying homage to the world’s past and present obsession with tattoos, in the aptly titled show Tatoueurs Tatoues.

Presenting over 300 contemporary and historical works of body art, the exhibition is a rich trek through the emergence, growth and commercialization of the tattoo. From photographs to silicone ‘body extracts’ to body suits, the works on display reveal the intricate aesthetic and specialized skill that’s long gone into tattooing.”

visual-poetry:

»falling alphabet« by anatol knotek

handmade, 26 pages, 21,5 x 7,5cm, sewn bindings, hardcover;
limited edition of 26 pieces;

each book has a different cover, dedicated to one letter of the alphabet 

if you are interested in buying this book just click here (paypal).

for more information or if you have any questions, please send me an email at: anatol[at]anatol[dot]cc

[my books available at the moment: anachronismwachseinfalling alphabet]

natgeotravel:

How do photographs create a sense of place?
Join the National Geographic Your Shot community and the current photo assignment, Sense of Place. National Geographic editor, Dan Westergren, is editing daily and looking for your photos to help create a final story with a sense of place.
Photograph by Amanda Nand, National Geographic Your Shot

natgeotravel:

How do photographs create a sense of place?

Join the National Geographic Your Shot community and the current photo assignment, Sense of Place. National Geographic editor, Dan Westergren, is editing daily and looking for your photos to help create a final story with a sense of place.

Photograph by Amanda Nand, National Geographic Your Shot